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  • Writer's pictureRahul R

Sales KPIs for Sales Teams

Sales Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) are metrics that organizations use to measure the effectiveness and efficiency of their sales team. They provide a way to track progress toward sales goals and identify areas for improvement. Here are some common sales KPIs for sales teams:


Lead Response Time


Lead response time is a critical KPI for any sales team as it measures how long it takes for a sales rep to respond to a lead or a customer inquiry. The faster the response time, the better the chances of closing a deal. The formula to calculate lead response time is:


Lead Response Time = Time of first response - Time of lead generation


Here, the time of lead generation is the time when the lead fills out a form or initiates contact with the company, and the time of the first response is the time when a sales rep contacts the lead for the first time. The lead response time is typically measured in minutes or hours. A lead response time of less than 5 minutes is considered ideal for most businesses.


Sales Activity Metrics


Here are some commonly used sales activity metrics KPIs with their formulas:

1.Number of calls made: The total number of phone calls made by the sales team during a given time period.

Formula: Total number of calls made.

2. Number of emails sent: The total number of emails sent by the sales team during a given time period.

Formula: Total number of emails sent.

3. Number of meetings held: The total number of meetings held between the sales team and prospects during a given time period.

Formula: Total number of meetings held.

4. Sales calls per day: The average number of sales calls made by each salesperson per day.

Formula: Total number of sales calls made / number of sales reps / number of working days.

5. Emails sent per day: The average number of emails sent by each salesperson per day.

Formula: Total number of emails sent / number of sales reps / number of working days.

6.Meetings held per day: The average number of meetings held by each salesperson per day.

Formula: Total number of meetings held / number of sales reps / number of working days.

7. Sales activity ratio: The ratio of sales activities (calls, emails, meetings) to the number of deals closed during a given time period.

Formula: (Total number of calls + Total number of emails + Total number of meetings) / Number of deals closed.

8. Sales activity conversion rate: The percentage of sales activities (calls, emails, meetings) that result in a deal being closed during a given time period.

Formula: (Number of deals closed / Total number of calls + Total number of emails + Total number of meetings) x 100.


Sales Conversion Rate


The Sales Conversion Rate KPI measures the percentage of leads that are converted into paying customers during a given period of time. The formula for calculating the Sales Conversion Rate is:


Sales Conversion Rate = (Number of Sales / Number of Leads) x 100%


For example, if a sales team generates 100 leads and converts 20 of them into paying customers, the Sales Conversion Rate would be:


Sales Conversion Rate = (20 / 100) x 100% = 20%


A high Sales Conversion Rate indicates that a sales team is effectively closing deals with potential customers, while a low rate may suggest that there are issues with the sales process or the quality of the leads being generated. It's important to track this KPI over time to identify trends and areas for improvement.


Sales Revenue


Sales Revenue KPI is a metric used to measure the amount of revenue generated by a business over a specific period of time. It provides insights into the financial performance of a company and its ability to generate revenue from its products or services.

The formula for calculating Sales Revenue is:


Sales Revenue = Units Sold x Average Selling Price

For example, if a company sells 100 units of a product at an average selling price of $50, the Sales Revenue for that period would be:


Sales Revenue = 100 x $50 = $5,000


Sales Revenue can be used to track the performance of a company's sales team, marketing efforts, and overall business strategy. It is also useful for forecasting future revenue and identifying areas for improvement.


Sales Pipeline Value


Sales pipeline value is a metric used by sales teams to track the total value of all potential deals in their pipeline. It provides an estimate of the revenue that the team expects to generate in the future, based on the value of the opportunities that are currently being pursued.


The formula for sales pipeline value is:


Sales Pipeline Value = Sum of the value of all deals in the pipeline


For example, if a sales team has 10 deals in their pipeline, with values of $50,000, $100,000, $75,000, $125,000, $150,000, $200,000, $50,000, $100,000, $75,000, and $125,000, the total sales pipeline value would be:


$50,000 + $100,000 + $75,000 + $125,000 + $150,000 + $200,000 + $50,000 + $100,000 + $75,000 + $125,000 = $1,025,000


In this example, the sales team has a sales pipeline value of $1,025,000. This means that they have over a million dollars' worth of potential deals in their pipeline, which they can use to forecast their future revenue.


Monthly Sales Growth


Monthly sales growth is an important sales key performance indicator (KPI) that measures the percentage increase or decrease in sales revenue from one month to the next. It is an essential metric that helps sales teams track their progress and growth over time, identify trends, and make informed decisions to improve their sales performance.


To calculate monthly sales growth, you need to compare the sales revenue from the current month with the sales revenue from the previous month. The formula for calculating monthly sales growth is as follows:


((Current Month Sales - Previous Month Sales) / Previous Month Sales) x 100


For example, if the sales revenue for the current month is $50,000 and the sales revenue for the previous month was $40,000, then the monthly sales growth would be:


(($50,000 - $40,000) / $40,000) x 100 = 25%


This means that the sales revenue for the current month has increased by 25% compared to the previous month.


Sales teams can use monthly sales growth as a benchmark to measure their progress towards their sales goals and targets. If the monthly sales growth is positive, it indicates that the sales team is performing well and that their efforts are paying off. On the other hand, if the monthly sales growth is negative, it indicates that the sales team needs to re-evaluate their strategies and tactics to improve their sales performance.


Average Profit Margin


Average profit margin is a financial metric that indicates how much profit a company makes on each dollar of sales. It is calculated by dividing the net income by the total revenue and multiplying it by 100 to express the result as a percentage. This KPI is used to assess the overall profitability of the company's operations.

To calculate the average profit margin for a sales team, you can use the following formula: (Average Revenue - Average Cost of Goods Sold) / Average Revenue x 100 Where:

  • Average Revenue: the average amount of revenue generated by the sales team over a specific period of time

  • Average Cost of Goods Sold: the average cost of the goods or services sold by the sales team over the same period of time

For example, if the sales team generated $500,000 in revenue and had $250,000 in cost of goods sold over a period of time, the average profit margin would be:

($500,000 - $250,000) / $500,000 x 100 = 50%

This means that for every dollar of sales, the sales team made a profit of 50 cents. Tracking the average profit margin KPI can help sales teams identify areas where they need to improve efficiency and reduce costs to increase profitability. It can also help managers make informed decisions about pricing strategies and product offerings to maximize profits.


Monthly Sales Bookings

Monthly Sales Bookings is a key performance indicator (KPI) that is used to measure the sales team's ability to generate revenue over a period of time, usually a month. This KPI is important because it provides an accurate measure of the revenue generated by the sales team and can help managers identify areas of strength and weakness.


To calculate monthly sales bookings, add up the total value of all sales made during the month, including new orders, renewals, and upsells. This figure should not include any discounts or other deductions.


For example, if a sales team generates $100,000 in sales during the month, the monthly sales bookings would be $100,000.


To track this KPI effectively, it's important to set a monthly sales target and measure actual bookings against that target. This will help managers identify trends and patterns in the team's performance and make adjustments as needed.


In addition, tracking this KPI on a regular basis can help sales teams identify opportunities for improvement, such as areas where they could be more effective at upselling or cross-selling to existing customers.


Sales Opportunities


Sales Opportunities KPI is a metric that measures the number of potential deals or prospects that a sales team has identified and qualified as possible sales. This KPI is important because it provides insight into the sales pipeline and helps sales managers forecast revenue and set targets for the sales team.


To calculate the Sales Opportunities KPI, follow these steps:

  1. Identify the time frame for which you want to calculate the KPI (e.g., monthly, quarterly, annually).

  2. Determine the total number of prospects or leads that were identified and qualified during that time frame.

  3. Calculate the average number of sales opportunities per month by dividing the total number of opportunities by the number of months in the time frame.

For example, if your sales team identified and qualified 150 leads in the last quarter, the Sales Opportunities KPI would be:


Sales Opportunities KPI = 150 / 3 = 50 sales opportunities per month


It's important to note that the definition of a sales opportunity may vary depending on the business and industry. Generally, a sales opportunity should be a qualified lead that has expressed interest in the product or service and has the potential to become a customer.


Sales Target


Sales target attainment = (Sales for the current period / sales target) x 100

Sales Target KPI is a critical performance metric for sales teams and organizations, as it measures the extent to which sales goals are being met. It is defined as the total sales revenue or number of units sold that a salesperson or team is expected to achieve within a specific period.

To effectively measure this KPI, it is important to establish realistic sales targets based on historical sales data, market conditions, and other relevant factors. Sales targets can be set for individuals, teams, products, or regions, and should be broken down into specific time periods, such as monthly, quarterly, or annually.

Sales targets should be communicated clearly to the sales team and monitored regularly to ensure that progress is being made towards achieving them. Sales managers can track progress towards sales targets through a variety of methods, including CRM systems, spreadsheets, or dashboards.

To improve performance and increase the likelihood of meeting sales targets, sales managers may provide coaching, training, or additional resources to sales teams. Regular performance reviews and feedback sessions can also help identify areas for improvement and enable sales teams to make necessary adjustments to their sales strategies.

In summary, the sales target KPI is a critical metric for measuring sales performance and should be monitored regularly to ensure that sales goals are being met. By setting realistic targets, providing necessary resources and support, and regularly reviewing performance, sales teams can increase their chances of achieving their targets and driving business success. Quote to Close KPI


The Quote-to-Close Ratio KPI is a measure of the effectiveness of the sales team in converting leads into actual sales. It is calculated by dividing the number of closed deals by the number of quotes provided. The formula is as follows:


Quote-to-Close Ratio = Number of Closed Deals / Number of Quotes Provided


For example, if the sales team closed 20 deals in a month and provided 100 quotes during the same period, the Quote-to-Close Ratio would be:


Quote-to-Close Ratio = 20 / 100 = 0.2 or 20%


A higher Quote-to-Close Ratio indicates that the sales team is effective in closing deals from the quotes provided, while a lower ratio indicates the need for improvements in the sales process, pricing strategy, or lead quality.


Average Purchase Value


Average Purchase Value (APV) is a sales KPI that measures the average amount of money customers spend on each purchase. It helps businesses understand their customers' spending habits and identify opportunities to increase revenue.


The formula for Average Purchase Value is:


APV = Total Revenue / Number of Purchases


For example, if a business generates $50,000 in total revenue from 1,000 purchases in a month, the APV would be:


APV = $50,000 / 1,000 = $50


This means that on average, customers spend $50 per purchase.

To improve the APV, businesses can focus on increasing the value of each transaction, such as by offering product bundles or cross-selling complementary products. They can also analyze their sales data to identify trends and adjust their pricing and promotional strategies accordingly.


Monthly Calls (or Emails) Per Sales Rep


The Monthly Calls (or Emails) Per Sales Rep KPI measures the number of calls or emails made by a sales representative within a month. This KPI can be used to track the productivity of the sales team and evaluate the effectiveness of the sales process.


Here's an example of how to calculate the Monthly Calls Per Sales Rep KPI:

  • Determine the time frame: For this KPI, we'll use a monthly time frame.

  • Count the total number of calls or emails: Add up the total number of calls or emails made by a sales representative in the month.

  • Calculate the average: Divide the total number of calls or emails by the number of sales representatives in the team.

For example, if a sales team of 10 representatives made a total of 800 calls in a month, the Monthly Calls Per Sales Rep KPI would be:


Monthly Calls Per Sales Rep = Total Number of Calls / Number of Sales Representatives


Monthly Calls Per Sales Rep = 800 / 10 Monthly Calls Per Sales Rep = 80


Therefore, the average number of calls made by each sales representative in a month is 80. This KPI can be used to identify areas where sales reps need more training or support to increase their productivity. It can also be used to evaluate the effectiveness of sales strategies and make necessary adjustments to improve the sales process.


Sales Per Rep KPI


Sales Per Rep is a key performance indicator (KPI) that helps to measure the sales productivity of individual sales representatives. It can be calculated as follows:


Sales Per Rep = Total Sales / Number of Sales Reps


For example, if a company has 10 sales representatives and they generate $1,000,000 in total sales, the Sales Per Rep KPI would be:


Sales Per Rep = $1,000,000 / 10 = $100,000


This KPI helps to identify the sales performance of individual sales representatives, and can be used to motivate and reward high-performing salespeople. It can also highlight areas where additional sales training or support may be required to improve sales productivity.


Product Performance


Product Performance KPI is a metric used by businesses to analyze the performance of their products in terms of sales, customer satisfaction, and profitability. It helps companies to identify the products that are driving their business and those that are not meeting expectations.

There are several key performance indicators that can be used to measure product performance, including:

  1. Sales Revenue: This is the total revenue generated by a product over a given period of time. It can be calculated by multiplying the total number of units sold by the price of each unit.

  2. Sales Growth: This is the percentage increase or decrease in sales revenue over a given period of time. It can be calculated by subtracting the sales revenue for the current period from the sales revenue for the previous period, dividing the result by the sales revenue for the previous period, and multiplying the result by 100.

  3. Customer Satisfaction: This is a measure of how satisfied customers are with a product. It can be measured through surveys, reviews, and feedback.

  4. Product Returns: This is the number of products returned by customers due to defects or other issues. High return rates can indicate a problem with the product's quality.

  5. Profit Margins: This is the percentage of profit generated by a product. It can be calculated by subtracting the total cost of production from the sales revenue, dividing the result by the sales revenue, and multiplying the result by 100.

Example: Let's say a company produces four products: Product A, Product B, Product C, and Product D. The company wants to measure the performance of each product over the last quarter. Here are the key performance indicators for each product: Product A:

  • Sales Revenue: $250,000

  • Sales Growth: 5%

  • Customer Satisfaction: 90%

  • Product Returns: 2%

  • Profit Margin: 30%

Product B:

  • Sales Revenue: $150,000

  • Sales Growth: -3%

  • Customer Satisfaction: 85%

  • Product Returns: 4%

  • Profit Margin: 20%

Product C:

  • Sales Revenue: $100,000

  • Sales Growth: 10%

  • Customer Satisfaction: 95%

  • Product Returns: 1%

  • Profit Margin: 25%

Product D:

  • Sales Revenue: $75,000

  • Sales Growth: 0%

  • Customer Satisfaction: 80%

  • Product Returns: 8%

  • Profit Margin: 10%

Based on these KPIs, the company can conclude that Product A and Product C are performing well, while Product B and Product D need improvement. The company can then take action to improve the performance of these products, such as investing in product development or improving customer support.

Sales By Contact Method Sales by Contact Method is a KPI that measures the effectiveness of different communication channels used to generate sales. It helps businesses to identify which channels are most effective in generating sales and allocate their resources accordingly.


Formula: Sales by Contact Method = (Sales by Contact Method A + Sales by Contact Method B + Sales by Contact Method C) / Total Sales


For example, if a business generated $100,000 in sales in a month, and the sales by contact method were as follows:

  • Sales by Contact Method A (phone): $50,000

  • Sales by Contact Method B (email): $30,000

  • Sales by Contact Method C (in-person): $20,000

Then the Sales by Contact Method KPI would be calculated as:


Sales by Contact Method = ($50,000 + $30,000 + $20,000) / $100,000 = 1


This indicates that phone calls are the most effective contact method for generating sales in this particular case, with a score of 1.

Average New Deal Size/Length


Average new deal size = Total revenue from new deals / total number of new deals


Average new deal length = Total number of days to close new deals / total number of deals


The Average New Deal Size/Length KPI is a metric that helps organizations to track the average size or length of new deals that their sales team closes over a specific period of time. This KPI is important because it can help organizations to understand how their sales team is performing and whether they are closing larger deals over time. It can also help identify areas where the sales team may need more training or support to improve their performance.

The formula to calculate Average New Deal Size/Length KPI is:

(Amount of new deals closed in a given period / Number of new deals closed in the same period) OR (Total length of new deals closed in a given period / Number of new deals closed in the same period)

For example, if a sales team closed 20 new deals in a given month with a total value of $100,000, then the Average New Deal Size KPI would be: $100,000 / 20 = $5,000

This means that the average size of each new deal closed by the sales team in that month was $5,000.

Similarly, if the average length of each new deal closed by the sales team in that month was 30 days, then the Average New Deal Length KPI would be:

30 days / 20 = 1.5 days

This means that the average length of each new deal closed by the sales team in that month was 1.5 days.

Overall, tracking the Average New Deal Size/Length KPI can help organizations to measure the effectiveness of their sales team and identify areas for improvement. Average Sales Cycle Length


Average sales cycle length = Total number of days to close all sales / total number of new deals

The Average Sales Cycle Length KPI measures the average time taken by a sales rep to close a deal from the first interaction with a potential customer to the final sale. It helps sales managers to understand the efficiency of their sales process and identify areas where improvements are required.


The formula for calculating the Average Sales Cycle Length KPI is:


Average Sales Cycle Length = Total number of days in the sales cycle / Number of closed deals


For example, suppose a sales team closed 10 deals in a month, and the total number of days in the sales cycle for these deals was 150. In that case, the Average Sales Cycle Length KPI would be:


Average Sales Cycle Length = 150 / 10 = 15


This means that, on average, it takes 15 days for the sales reps to close a deal from the first interaction with a potential customer to the final sale.


By tracking this KPI over time, sales managers can identify trends and take corrective actions to optimize their sales processes. For instance, if the average sales cycle length is increasing, they may need to re-evaluate their lead generation strategy or provide additional training to their sales reps to improve their conversion rates.

Lead-to-Sale Percentage


Lead to sale % = (Total number of sales / total number of leads) x 100


Lead-to-Sale % KPI, also known as conversion rate, is a metric that measures the percentage of leads that turn into actual sales. It is a critical metric for businesses as it helps them understand the effectiveness of their sales process and the quality of their leads.


The formula for calculating Lead-to-Sale % KPI is:


(Number of sales / Number of leads) x 100


For example, if a company had 100 leads and 20 of them turned into sales, the Lead-to-Sale % KPI would be:


(20/100) x 100 = 20%


This means that the company was able to convert 20% of their leads into sales. A high conversion rate indicates that a company is doing a good job of qualifying leads, nurturing them through the sales process, and closing deals. On the other hand, a low conversion rate indicates that a company may need to revisit its sales process, lead generation strategies, or product offerings to improve sales performance.


Average Cost Per Lead


Average cost per lead = Total cost of campaign / number of leads generated


The Average Cost Per Lead (CPL) KPI measures the cost of generating a single lead for the sales team. This KPI helps companies understand the effectiveness of their marketing campaigns and the efficiency of their lead generation efforts.


Formula for Average Cost Per Lead:


CPL = Total Cost of Lead Generation / Total Number of Leads Generated


For example, if a company spends $10,000 on marketing campaigns and generates 500 leads, the CPL would be:


CPL = $10,000 / 500 = $20


This means that each lead cost the company $20 to generate.


The ideal CPL varies depending on the industry, market, and specific company goals. In general, a lower CPL is better, as it indicates that the company is generating more leads for the same amount of money. However, it's important to balance the cost of lead generation with the quality of the leads generated. A low CPL may not be worth it if the leads are of poor quality and don't result in sales.


Retention and Churn Rates


Retention rate = ((Number of customers at the end of period – number of customers acquired during period) / starting number of customers) x 100


Retention and churn rates are essential key performance indicators (KPIs) that measure the number of customers who continue to do business with a company over a period of time and those who discontinue doing business, respectively. These KPIs provide insights into the health and growth of a company's customer base, helping them to identify potential problems and opportunities to improve customer retention.

The formula to calculate retention rate is as follows:

Retention rate = ((E-N)/S)) x 100 Where:

  • E = the number of customers at the end of a period

  • N = the number of new customers acquired during that period

  • S = the number of customers at the start of the period

The formula to calculate churn rate is as follows:

Churn rate = (C/S) x 100

Where:

  • C = the number of customers lost during a period

  • S = the number of customers at the start of the period

For example, if a company had 100 customers at the start of the quarter, acquired 10 new customers during the quarter, and ended the quarter with 105 customers, the retention rate would be calculated as follows:

Retention rate = ((105-10)/100) x 100 = 95%

If the company also lost 5 customers during the quarter, the churn rate would be calculated as follows:

Churn rate = (5/100) x 100 = 5%


Customer Lifetime Value


Customer lifetime value = Gross margin % x retention rate x average revenue per customer

Customer Lifetime Value (CLV) is a key performance indicator that estimates the total revenue a business can expect from a customer over the entire period of the relationship. Here's the formula for calculating CLV:


CLV = (Average Order Value x Number of Repeat Sales x Average Retention Time) - Acquisition Cost

  • Average Order Value: This is the average amount of money a customer spends each time they make a purchase.

  • Number of Repeat Sales: This is the average number of times a customer makes a purchase within a given time period.

  • Average Retention Time: This is the average length of time a customer continues to make purchases from the company.

  • Acquisition Cost: This is the cost of acquiring a new customer, which can include advertising, marketing, and sales expenses.

Once you have all of these numbers, you can plug them into the formula to calculate the CLV for each customer. The CLV is a useful metric for understanding the long-term value of your customers and can help you make decisions about how to allocate resources to retain existing customers and acquire new ones.

Average Conversion Time


Average conversion time = Total length of time to convert lead to sale / total number of new deals


Average Conversion Time (ACT) is a key performance indicator (KPI) that measures the average time it takes for a customer to move from initial contact to a closed sale. This KPI can help businesses identify areas for improvement in their sales processes and identify potential bottlenecks.


The formula for calculating Average Conversion Time is:


ACT = (Total time spent on sales process for all customers) / (Number of customers)


For example, let's say a company spent a total of 600 hours on sales activities for the month and closed 50 sales during that time. The Average Conversion Time for that month would be:


ACT = 600 / 50 = 12 hours


This means that, on average, it takes the company 12 hours to convert a lead into a sale.

It's important to note that Average Conversion Time can vary depending on the industry, product or service being sold, and the sales cycle length. Businesses should track this metric over time to identify trends and potential issues that may be impacting their sales performance.

New and Expansion Monthly Recurring Revenue (MRR)


Monthly recurring revenue (MRR) = (Average monthly revenue from total new and expanded accounts / total number of accounts) x total number of accounts that month


New and Expansion Monthly Recurring Revenue (MRR) is a key performance indicator (KPI) that measures the growth of a company's recurring revenue from new customers and existing customers. MRR is a metric used by subscription-based businesses to measure the predictable and recurring revenue generated each month.

New MRR is the amount of monthly recurring revenue generated from new customers, while Expansion MRR is the amount of monthly recurring revenue generated from existing customers who have increased their subscription or added new services.

The formula to calculate New MRR is:

New MRR = (New customers x Average subscription revenue per customer) / Month

For example, if a company adds 50 new customers with an average monthly subscription revenue of $100 in a month, the New MRR would be:

New MRR = (50 x $100) / 1 = $5,000

The formula to calculate Expansion MRR is:

Expansion MRR = (Existing customers x Additional revenue per customer) / Month

For example, if a company has 100 existing customers who added an additional service with an average monthly revenue of $50, the Expansion MRR would be:

Expansion MRR = (100 x $50) / 1 = $5,000

To calculate the Total MRR, add the New MRR and Expansion MRR:

Total MRR = New MRR + Expansion MRR

In this example, the Total MRR would be $10,000.

Monitoring the New and Expansion MRR can help businesses track their growth and identify opportunities to increase revenue. Number of Monthly Onboarding and Demo Calls


The Number of Monthly Onboarding and Demo Calls KPI is a metric that measures the number of calls or demos that the sales team conducts in a given month to onboard new customers or provide product demos to prospects.


Formula: Number of Monthly Onboarding and Demo Calls = Total number of onboarding and demo calls made in a month


Example: Let's say the sales team of a software company conducts a total of 100 onboarding and demo calls in a month. Then the Number of Monthly Onboarding and Demo Calls KPI for that month would be 100.


This KPI can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of the sales team in converting prospects into customers and onboarding new customers onto the platform. It can also help in identifying areas where the sales team may need additional training or resources to improve their performance.


Customer Acquisition Cost


Customer acquisition cost = Total sales and marketing cost / number of new customers

Customer Acquisition Cost (CAC) is a critical KPI for any business. It represents the total cost incurred by a company to acquire a new customer. The formula to calculate CAC is:


CAC = Total Sales and Marketing Expenses / Number of New Customers Acquired


To break it down further, the "Total Sales and Marketing Expenses" refer to all the costs associated with acquiring new customers, including advertising costs, marketing expenses, salaries of sales and marketing staff, and any other direct costs. The "Number of New Customers Acquired" refers to the total number of new customers acquired within a given period.


A high CAC indicates that a company is spending too much money to acquire new customers, which could be detrimental to its profitability in the long run. Conversely, a low CAC indicates that a company is effectively acquiring new customers at a low cost, which could lead to better profitability.


It's important to note that the ideal CAC varies from industry to industry and business to business. Therefore, companies need to determine their target CAC based on their specific circumstances and objectives.

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